Instead of placing black or clear sheets on kudzu for extended periods of time, we experimented with alternation. For example, the first photograph shows a test plot covered with a clear sheet. Two weeks later the sheet is moved to the test plot behind the first, as shown in the second photo. This switching occurs every two weeks. So each treated area has a two week recovery period for the kudzu. The idea is to accelerate depletion of kudzu energy reserves in the tuber root. We wanted to know if this is more effective at killing kudzu then continuous treatment with sheets. If so, then half as much sheeting can do a better job, thereby reducing material costs or reducing treatment time for a given area. June 2005.

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The method is tested on a mound of construction debris in the Coalition test site. In this case black plastic sheets are used. The two areas treated are adjacent. In the first photograph the mound is uncovered and the sheet is moved to the right for two weeks, and in the second photograph the mound is uncovered and the sheet is moved to the left for two weeks. June 2005.

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One year later we find that the treatment of alternating sheets on our flat test plot reduced the amount of kudzu by a factor of about six; that is, a decrease of about 80%. This is no more effective than leaving a sheet in place. May 2006.

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