This photograph from the Spartanburg Herald-Journal underscores that kudzu is sometimes an urban fire hazard. Click here for the full story on this particular fire. (A later account of a different fire reports a case where kudzu is only indirectly involved.)

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Coalition volunteers visited the site to see how kudzu was affected by the fire. The fire "cleaned up" the frost-killed foliage, which unfortunately reveals trash and contruction debris on this "abandoned" lot. December 2005.

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However, woody vines remain, form a dense network on top of the soil, and drape over depressions and mounds. December 2005.

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The demarcation between burned and unburned areas is obvious the following spring. March 2006.

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Curously, we observe that soil erosion under surviving woody vines appears greater on flat ground than on inclined ground. March 2006.

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Coalition flags mark the fire range boundary for monitoring kudzu grow-back during the imminent growing season. March 2006.

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Before and after photographs of the same area show that kudzu growth is not noticeably retarded by the prior year's fire. March and May 2006.

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Anyone considering the use of burning as a treatment for kudzu must understand how fire affects it. The USDA Forest Service Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) explains how fire affects kudzu, and how it escapes damage.