Henry and Edith Edwards run "Kudzu Cow Farm" in Rutherfordton, North Carolina. They credit kudzu with saving their dairy business during a severe drought when traditional forage for their cows was scarce. Henry developed a way to harvest and bale kudzu as a fodder substitute for their farm. They also sell their bales. Edith's interest in the multitude of uses for kudzu resulted in a writer christening her "The Kudzu Queen". She attends fairs and festivals spreading the word that kudzu is an opportunity, not a problem. The University of North Carolina broadcast a video several years ago that features how kudzu is used at the Edwards farm. They sell a booklet "What We Do with Kudzu!", and other literature, which can be purchased by phoning them at (828) 247-0067.

The Kudzu Coalition invited Edith to participate in Kudzu Kapers in April 2007. The Edwards invited The Coalition to watch them harvesting kudzu at their farm during August 2007. The following photographs were taken during that visit.

Prior to the Coalition visit, Henry had cut the kudzu and left it in the field a few days to cure. The photographs show Henry feeding the cut kudzu into the baler.

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The bales are held together by twine, and without it the bales easily fall apart. Henry lies down on the job — to thread up and tie the twine that is used by the baler! Note the rows of kudzu in the field in the background ready for baling in the right photograph.

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Coalition volunteer Paul Savko hoists hefty bales of kudzu, and Edith Edwards keeps a watchful eye on the proceedings during a very hot day.

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